Water Online

JUL 2017

Water Innovations gives Water and Wastewater Engineers and end-users a venue to find project solutions and source valuable product information. We aim to educate the engineering and operations community on important issues and trends.

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By Peter Chawaga W ater has long played a critical role in how the world's greatest cities were formed and how they grow into the future. With an understanding of just how crucial that relationship is, AECOM, an infrastructure design and construction firm, and Asia Society, a nonprofit focused on education about the continent, centered the inaugural year of its "Imagine 2060" program on the world's urban waterfronts. The overall program, which will be conducted for three years and travel around the world, wants to motivate leaders in urban design, infrastructure, and public policy to think about the long-term infrastructure needs of their respective cities. "AECOM and Asia Society identified five key lenses through which to consider each city's future state," said Sylvester Wong, an AECOM vice president and its head of buildings and places for the Philippines. "It is the effective balance of well-being, economic development, culture, mobility, and innovation in project delivery, which lie at the heart of any city's success. Using these lenses, AECOM and Asia Society will ensure the key insights are collected and shared between the cities and the participants." All five of these lenses could easily describe the importance of renewed focus on a city's relationship to water, particularly those with waterfronts. With that in mind, the first year of Imagine 2060 will visit Manila, Sydney, Los Angeles, New York City, and Hong Kong under the title "2017: At The Water's Edge." "Seafronts and riverfronts are the birthplace of most of the world's urban conurbations," Wong said. "As cities have grown, their relationship with water has grown, as an essential potable resource, as a mode of transport, as access to trade. But also as a threat, from flooding and climate change, to a conveyance of pollution." Exploring Manila The program began with a visit to Manila. The city's history provided an ideal starting point to examine the role that water plays on city infrastructure. "Water surrounds Manila on three sides. Water-related experiences and quality touch the lives of everyone in the city," said Wong. "By re-embracing Manila's identity as one of Asia's most relevant waterfront economies, ManileƱos have an 28 wateronline.com n Water Innovations Touring The World Of Water Infrastructure An ambitious, globe-trotting program invites attendees to learn from the infrastructure accomplishments and challenges of the world's premier riverfront cities. With water becoming an increasingly valuable resource and the world's drinking and wastewater infrastructure in peril, what can these metropolises teach us? The overall program, which will be conducted for three years and travel around the world, wants to motivate leaders in urban design, infrastructure, and public policy to think about the long-term infrastructure needs of their respective cities.

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